Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Skip to content Skip to navigation

Home Page

The new Stanford Natural Gas Initiative examines the dynamic, multifaceted questions raised by the tremendous growth in natural gas production by focusing the efforts of Stanford’s faculty, researchers, and students in six key areas: Resource Development, Environmental Impacts and  Climate Change, Uses of Natural Gas, Global Markets and Finance, Policy and Regulatory Reform, and Geopolitical Impacts.

“If developed in an environmentally sustainable manner, globally abundant natural gas resources will enable large-scale fuel switching for electrical power generation. This will dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution in many countries, while enhancing energy security and economic growth.  In this context, natural gas can play a critically important role as a transition fuel on the path to a decarbonized energy future.”

—Mark Zoback, Director, Stanford Natural Gas Initiative


There are 1 billion people in the world without access to electricity, another 2 billion that have inadequate, unreliable electricity, and 3 billion without access to modern cooking energy.  Achieving access to modern energy in developing economies is required to allow countries to realize their full economic potential and meet the aspirations of their citizens. To discuss this issue, the Stanford Natural Gas Initiative will host a symposium on May 9 and 10, 2017 at Stanford on Reducing Energy Poverty with Natural Gas: New Technologies and Changing Paradigms.  See how you can get involved.

Gas and hydrocarbons represent 90% of the world’s energy. This has to change, but how will it play out? How will gas affect different sectors; how will it interact with other energy sources? Do renewables require gas? What are the drawbacks and the real measures of what’s good and what’s bad about gas? This candid conversation with leading gas experts from Stanford University spanning the value chain, and industry expert and distinguished leader Maarten Wetselaar, explores these questions and more.

A new “virtual gas field simulator” developed by Stanford scientists and supported by the Natural Gas Initiative, aims to help companies and government agencies weigh the economic costs and benefits of different methane leak detection technologies and pick the best one for a given situation