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Announcing NGI Request for Proposals

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

This call for proposals from the Stanford Natural Gas Initiative is open to Stanford faculty performing new research in any aspect of natural gas development, use, policy, markets or impacts. A letter of intent to submit is due on February 15, 2016, and full proposals are due on March 15, 2016. Expected funding for each proposed project is up to $100,000 per year.

This call for proposals from the Stanford Natural Gas Initiative (ngi.stanford.edu) is open to Stanford faculty performing new research in any aspect of natural gas development, use, policy, markets or impacts. A letter of intent to submit is due on February 15, 2016, and full proposals are due on March 15, 2016. These dates are earlier than the 2015 award process in order to reach funding decisions before August 2016 and to remain aligned with the timeline for other Precourt Institute for Energy funding opportunities, which will also be issuing RFPs this week.

This is a general call for proposals related to the Natural Gas Initiative, which will be supported by funds from the Initiative. Expected funding for each proposed project is up to $100,000 per year. Projects will be funded for a period of one year with an option to renew for a second year upon approval.
The Natural Gas Initiative’s key areas of focus for new research are:

Resource Development

  • Environmental Impacts and Climate Change
  • Natural Gas as a Fuel, Feedstock and Catalyst
  • Global Markets and Economic Impacts
  • Policy and Regulatory Reform
  • Geopolitical Impacts

Research in any specific area or combination of these areas is of particular interest. The initiative is especially interested in research that can address: (1) integration and optimization of natural gas in clean energy strategies; (2) comprehensive assessment of the benefits and risks of natural gas development; (3) how natural gas could help alleviate energy poverty and improve living conditions in the developing world. Proposals that involve interdisciplinary efforts, especially those that bring together faculty in new ways, are encouraged. The proposed work may involve the broad range of disciplines involved in energy, for example, science, engineering, policy, and/or social science, individually or in combination.

Technical questions: Brad Ritts or Mark Zoback